THE DOG DIET could be the last diet you ever go on...
you might just be like I was...it's not what you're eating...but what's eating you.
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Author Patti Lawson

Guest Idea / Interview Opportunity

WHO: Patti Lawson, dog owner, former frustrated dieter and author of The Dog Diet
WHAT: Discussion on how owning a dog changes the way you eat, exercise and view life. Includes recipes, dog wisdom, diet tips and special "dogercises"
WHEN: Lawson and Sadie are available for interviews, beginning in April 2006. May 7-13 is National Pet Week.

Lawson can:
* Explain how the simple act of adopting a dog is responsible for her weight loss
* Discuss the "Seven day Dog Diet meal plan" and demo "dog diet" recipes
* Tell what her dog, Sadie, taught her about her human relationships and even stress
* Discuss the importance of adopting shelter dogs
* Discuss how being a dog owner changes the focus of your life

Patti and Sadie
on WTOC Midmorning Live

Channel 11 CBS Savannah www.wtoc.com
WTOC Midmorning Live

Watch the interview at Patti's RedRoom Site

January 4, 2012 Local writer contributes to latest in ‘Chicken Soup’ series

November 10, 2011 Old Dog Made an Entire Community His Family

August 11, 2011 Dogs in Dorm Rooms

AOL MyDailyRead Patti's royal wedding adventures on her blog at AOL Lifestyle...
Posted on myDaily May 4th, 2011

 

January 14, 2011 Who Gets the Dog in a Divorce? AOL

May 19, 2009, The Washington Post

September 29, 2008 The Post & Courier, Charleston.Net

June 3, 2008 Greenville News

July 20, 2007 Orlando Sentinal

July 19, 2007 Channel 11 CBS Savannah, Mid-morning Live

February 2007 MSNBC Creature Comforts

April 24, 2006 eDiets News

April 29, 2006 Animal Radio

May 5, 2006 Glee Magazine

Dog-Eat-Lawyer World

Resolve to skip that diet drink and pick up a leash 1/3/2006, USA Today

Animal Radio

 

GUEST IDEA / INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITY

CONTACT:
Kim Weiss, HCI Books, (800) 851-9100 ext. 212 or kimw@hcibooks.com

Weight Loss Tip? Get a Dog!
Patti Lawson tells "What My Dog Taught Me about Shedding Pounds,
Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life"

(CHARLESTON, WV) In the not too distant past, successful attorney Patti Lawson was a diet-obsessed, high-achieving perfectionist. Grapefruit diet, egg diet, 4-Day diet, no carb diet, you name it...she tried them all. She bought every diet supplement on the market, hired personal trainers, wrapped her thighs in plastic, suffered in steam rooms and added to her collection of AB rollers and thigh masters.

And so it went until a little dog taught her some big lessons about life. Deep in mourning the demise of her latest relationship, Lawson spent most of her time holed up in her house with every imaginable comfort food on her coffee table. Several months later, feeling pudgy and pitiful she knew she had to do something to rejoin the human race.

One day, on an impulse - that she still can't fully explain - she drove her pristine Mercedes to the nearest PetsMart. That fortuitous trip brought rascally puppy Sadie into Lawson's life - a little black and tan dog she promised to take care of for "one night."

A unique approach to dieting and lifestyle change, The Dog Diet (HCI, April 2006) is an inspiring and moving account of how changing the focus of your life can get you back in the game-and in Lawson's case, back into her size four jeans.

"Dogs, unlike many people, are not only dependable, they make us better people. They teach us to look at ourselves like they do and most of us finally learn that happiness really is as Dorothy found out in Oz - right in our own back yards," says Lawson. "They show us that we are OK just the way we are and love us for ourselves."

Now an advocate for adopting shelter dogs, Lawson participates in fundraising events for shelters and supports spaying and neutering pets.

To schedule an interview with Patti Lawson or request a review copy and more information, please contact Elaine Krackau, PR by the Book, 512-733-5145 or elaine@prbythebook.com.

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Charleston Daily Mail

January 4, 2012 by Monica Orosz Daily Mail staff

Local writer contributes to latest in ‘Chicken Soup’ series

Chicken Soup for the Soul, Food and LoveCHARLESTON, W.Va. - A Charleston writer who usually writes about dogs is equally at home writing essays about family and food - and appears in the newest "Chicken Soup for the Soul" series.

Patti Lawson is a lawyer by day, working as a special assistant prosecutor for the insurance fraud division of the state Insurance Commission.

But she's also a columnist and author of two books, the second of which comes out this year. She won the Dog Writer's Association of America's Maxwell Award for Dog Humor Book of the Year in 2007

Most often, Lawson enjoys writing about dogs - often, weaving stories of her beloved Sadie. Her first book was "The Dog Diet: A Memoir. What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a new Leash on Life." Her upcoming book is entitled, "What Happens to Rover When the Marriage is Over and Other Doggone Legal Dilemmas," which weaves her love of animals with her legal expertise.

Lawson said her agent suggested she tap into the "Chicken Soup" books.

"She is always looking for opportunities for me," she said. "They don't pay much, but they're a really credible publishing credit," she said.

The "Chicken Soup" series includes essays assembled by topic. The most recent one contains essays about food and love.

Lawson's first was for "Chicken Soup for the Grandma's Soul," and included a story about her grandmother.

Her most recent is a funny story about her father's cooking adventure after discovering the then-new Food Network. He made a mess of the kitchen and substituted a lot of ingredients in a Bobby Flay recipe that turned out to be delicious.

"It was such a funny story," Lawson said. "I grew up with eight kids and little or no money. We weren't used to gourmet meals. The first time I went to a fancy restaurant, I let the guy order for me."

"When my parents got cable TV, it was hilarious that they got into these cooking shows."

Lawson said her dad is thrilled with the essay.

She said tapping into the "Chicken Soup" market was as easy as checking out the website for upcoming topics and writing a strong essay.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A Charleston writer who usually writes about dogs is equally at home writing essays about family and food - and appears in the newest "Chicken Soup for the Soul" series.
Patti Lawson is a lawyer by day, working as a special assistant prosecutor for the insurance fraud division of the state Insurance Commission.

But she's also a columnist and author of two books, the second of which comes out this year. She won the Dog Writer's Association of America's Maxwell Award for Dog Humor Book of the Year in 2007

Most often, Lawson enjoys writing about dogs - often, weaving stories of her beloved Sadie. Her first book was "The Dog Diet: A Memoir. What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a new Leash on Life." Her upcoming book is entitled, "What Happens to Rover When the Marriage is Over and Other Doggone Legal Dilemmas," which weaves her love of animals with her legal expertise.

Lawson said her agent suggested she tap into the "Chicken Soup" books.

"She is always looking for opportunities for me," she said. "They don't pay much, but they're a really credible publishing credit," she said.

The "Chicken Soup" series includes essays assembled by topic. The most recent one contains essays about food and love.

Lawson's first was for "Chicken Soup for the Grandma's Soul," and included a story about her grandmother.

Her most recent is a funny story about her father's cooking adventure after discovering the then-new Food Network. He made a mess of the kitchen and substituted a lot of ingredients in a Bobby Flay recipe that turned out to be delicious.

"It was such a funny story," Lawson said. "I grew up with eight kids and little or no money. We weren't used to gourmet meals. The first time I went to a fancy restaurant, I let the guy order for me."

"When my parents got cable TV, it was hilarious that they got into these cooking shows."

Lawson said her dad is thrilled with the essay.

She said tapping into the "Chicken Soup" market was as easy as checking out the website for upcoming topics and writing a strong essay.

"They have possible story ideas listed there," she said. "It's a great opportunity for anyone who wants to write. And they're only 1,200 words.

"I have one pending for 'I Can't Believe My Dog Did That,' " she added.

She's also had essays appear in "Chicken Soup for the Soul All in the Family" and in "Single Women. . .of a Certain Age."

While Lawson is specifically a dog lover, she's got a soft spot for other animals, too, like the pet bird named Abby she adopted - or rescued, actually - when someone literally tossed it out a car window.

Abby may even provide fodder for future writing.

"She loves Sadie," Lawson said. "And she has a boyfriend - a wild cardinal."

The two flirt through the window of her home, Lawson said.

"And while they're visiting, his bird wife comes and beats on him," she said.

Lawson has a website at www.thedogdiet.com.

The "Chicken Soup" books are widely available in bookstores and online. Lawson said anyone wishing to have an autographed copy may contact her through her website to arrange it.

Contact writer Monica Orosz at mon...@dailymail.com or 304-348-4830.

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AOL Pawnation

Old Dog Made an Entire Community His Family

By Patti Lawson
November 11, 2011

Sam has no real job, yet he gets plenty to eat. He's is not on unemployment; he does not receive welfare or any type of Social Security benefits. Sam pays no rent and doesn't own a house, but he sleeps in a comfortable bed every night and it's not at a shelter. He doesn't go to a free clinic or get Medicaid, yet he has excellent medical care and is in very good health for someone who is 91 years old.

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AOL Pawnation

Dogs in Dorm Rooms

By Patti Lawson
August 11th 2011

Some students aren't choosing colleges for their academic rating, diverse majors, or the sports programs. Instead many college bound students think the most important criteria their future alma mater can offer is room in the dorm for their dog.

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AOL Pawnation


Who Gets the Dog in a Divorce?

By Patti Lawson
Jan 14th 2011

Divorce is never easy. And it's worse when your beloved pet is caught in the middle yet this seems to be happening more and more. Animal law emerged only about 10 years ago, and today half of the 190 accredited law schools in the United States, including Harvard and Yale, offer courses in animal law, including pet custody.

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Mile for Mile, a Dog Is a Man's (or a Woman's) Best Workout Partner

By Vicky Hallett Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Unlike first kids Malia and Sasha, my brother and I never convinced our parents to let us adopt a dog. "I'm allergic," lied my dad, while my mom came up with a more creative excuse: "We don't believe in species subjugation." Actually, they didn't believe in picking up poop. Which, in hindsight, is understandable.

But I've come up with a new, foolproof tactic for kids pleading for a Portuguese water pup: Tell your parents it could help them lose weight.

Then hand over a copy of "The Dog Diet: What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life." The author, Patti Lawson, found herself quite by chance saddled with a pooch; she then discovered, just as unexpectedly, that her new roommate was shrinking her waistline -- by stealing her snacks, providing the comfort she used to look for in pints of ice cream and forcing her to wake up before dawn for walks. (The first lady could certainly vouch for that last point: A few weeks ago, she told a group of congressional wives that Bo has her up and out at 5:15 a.m.)

"She wanted to be so active, and it became much more fun," says Lawson, who quickly discovered that exercise with her furry personal trainer could be its own reward. "And she never begged me to stop for a latte, like my girlfriends."

Jessica Berger Gross shares a similar experience in "enLIGHTened: How I Lost 40 Pounds with a Yoga Mat, Fresh Pineapples, and a Beagle Pointer." When she and her husband adopted Salem from a shelter, they figured they were signing up for "love and snuggles," not a weight-loss program. But that was before they realized that only an exhausted Salem wouldn't chew up their furniture.

"Living and exercising with a dog teaches you to integrate fitness in a natural way. It's not always about putting gym clothes on," Gross says. Instead, she and her husband learned to burn calories by heading to the dog park and exploring hiking trails. Now they're walking for an hour a day, and often plan two- or three-hour excursions on weekends, which help improve their attitudes as well as Salem's. "We become grumpy if we don't get our exercise," she adds.

Before you go off and adopt a dog for the fitness benefits, though, remember that unlike a set of stretchy bands, the total tail-wagging package comes with a fair share of slobbering and shedding. If you're like my parents (or apartment-dwelling me), that might sound a little, well, ruff.

And there's another way to dabble in dog time. Every other Saturday morning, volunteers for the Washington Humane Society gather to give the friskiest residents of their two shelters a workout. Kevin Simpson, director of animal training and behavior for WHS, has dubbed the year-old group the People & Animal Cardio Klub, or PACK. (Because pack animals run together. Get it?)

"People love it because they're helping out and getting exercise," he says. The cooped-up canines get an even better deal: They're socializing and blowing off steam, which means they'll be better behaved and, thus, more adoptable.

Watching the group meet up a few weeks ago for a jog in Rock Creek Park, I realized it really is true what they say about runners coming in all shapes and sizes -- including seven-pound, four-legged balls of fluff.

Because some of them can seriously dash, and because volunteer Josh Kaplan, 28, never knows whose leash he'll be holding, he puts in extra gym time to prep for PACK outings. "If I don't do the treadmill, I can't do the four miles," he says. "I don't want to keep the dog from getting exercise. So this gives me motivation."

There's a role for anyone who wants to lend a paw, from "greyhounds" like Kaplan who can keep up with the speedsters to "bulldogs" who handle the slowpokes with a gentle jog/walk. (To sign up, write Simpson at AsktheTrainer @ washhumane.org,or call him at 202-723-5730, ext. 122.) And plenty of folks show up with their own dogs just because it's fun.

After all, explains 36-year-old Dolores Hamilton, Alley, her Rottweiler, always has her sprinting anyway. "If I walk with her, all she'll do is pull me along," says Hamilton, who adds that she'd never be breaking this much of a sweat solo. "I would have no motivation to run alone. She gets me out of the house." Alley also has Hamilton cross-training with "stick tug-of-war."

Simpson recognizes that PACK could stand to branch out a bit as well. His black Lab never minds joining him on jogs, but she also digs in-line skating and biking, which are possible future activities for the group.

Perhaps such varied workouts would also be wise for the first family? If the Obamas want to prevent Bo from tearing up the Lincoln Bedroom, they'd better get moving.

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Oct 6, 2007 ... Dog Helps With Weight Loss Patti Lawson, The Dog Diet

Three years ago Patti drove to PetsMart just to look at dogs because she was tired of being lonely and thought maybe a dog would cheer her up. There fate in the form of a lady volunteer at the Love-A Pet-Adoption Center tapped her on the shoulder and handed her a little black and tan puppy to hold for a minute.

Fast forward three years and this little puppy is now a long-legged Pollyanna type creature she named Sadie and simply cannot imagine her life without her.

While it was not love at first sight for either of them, they found their way together and formed a bond stronger that anything Patti experienced... Along the way, Sadie lifted her out of that depressive state, helped her lose over 30 pounds and fills her days with once unimaginable joy.

While Pattie won't lend her dog Sadie out to anyone, perhaps you already have one of these amazing dogs, or can find one at your local shelter.

 

The Post and Courier

Fitness goes to the dogs

Canines help humans drop some excess weight by offering motivation to take a walk

By David Quick, Monday, September 29, 2008

Forget the disappointing diets, costly health clubs and pricey personal trainers. Patti Lawson had gone that route and discovered a simpler solution.

She got a dog.

By walking with her dog, Sadie, twice a day, Lawson lost 30 pounds (and kept it off), started eating healthier and got off the roller coaster of fitness that millions of Americans ride on a daily basis.

The government lawyer who lives in the other Charleston, the one in West Virginia, chronicled her experience in a book published in 2006 titled "The Dog Diet: What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life."

It won her the Dog Writers Association of America's Maxwell Award for humor book of the year in 2007, an appearance at the banquet prior to the Westminster Dog Show in New York that year and made her an advocate for a novel niche — getting people to exercise with their dogs — in media and in appearances throughout the country.

Lawson says people regularly talk to her or e-mail her about the book, often confessing that they don't think to walk their dogs. But her message is getting out there. For example, Women's World Magazine is profiling a woman who lost 60 pounds by walking her dog.

"It's such an easy thing to do," says Lawson, who walks Sadie a mile in the morning and up to four miles in the evenings, even in the gloomy cold and dark of West Virginia winters.

Regularly walking a dog, Lawson says, can be as much a spiritual journey as a physical one.

"I notice things in my neighborhood that I never saw before," she says. "This spring, we had a rabbit in my neighborhood. During walks, every time we turn the corner (near the rabbit-sighting spot), Sadie would pick up the pace. She kept doing that long after the rabbit disappeared. ... Things like that lighten up my spirit."

Four-legged trainers

Unfortunately, most Americans likely are not taking advantage of what Lawson calls the "four-legged personal trainer."

With 65 million dogs, Americans lead the world not only in dog ownership but in obesity rates. (Continue reading at charleston.net)

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Greenville News, Greenville, SC

With a puppy to love, author no longer needed food to fill the hole in her heart

By Donna Isbell Walker • STAFF WRITER • June 3, 2008

Like many women, Patti Lawson turned to food for comfort during a long, bleak winter and a painful romantic breakup five years ago.

She felt “pudgy and pitiful,” lacking the motivation to do more than think fleetingly about getting into shape for spring before reaching for another candy bar.

But a chance visit to a pet store one dull Saturday night netted her an unlikely personal trainer, best friend and, ultimately, muse — a mixed-breed dog with floppy ears and wise brown eyes.

Lawson, a South Carolina native and an attorney in West Virginia, has written a book about the life-changing friendship with the cocker spaniel-German shepherd puppy she named Sadie. “The Dog Diet,” subtitled “What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life,” tells the story of how Lawson managed to get fit and happy just by making room in her heart and home for a pound puppy.


In the book, Lawson reluctantly takes home the puppy for a night, then returns it the next day after being kept awake half the night by barking and the dog’s many trips outdoors to tend to bathroom business. But she soon realizes she misses the dog and returns to the pet store to claim the puppy for keeps.

For the first week, Sadie keeps Lawson so busy she doesn’t have time to overeat, and when she tries to sneak ice cream into the bed one night, the dog leaps onto Lawson. The bowl overturns, the bed sheets are covered in chocolate goo, and Lawson decides it’s just not worth it.

When she finally takes a moment to step onto one of her three precisely calibrated bathroom scales, Lawson finds she has lost eight pounds, without even trying.

The next day at work, her secretary asks what she’s doing to lose the weight, and Lawson replies, “I’m on the dog diet,” the author recalled in a recent phone interview.

Eventually, Lawson lost 30 pounds, although she said she has since regained a few. But the changes in eating habits and lifestyle, as well as attitude, have become permanent.

She found that whenever she ate something that smelled good, Sadie wanted to share. If Lawson opened a package or a can and Sadie could hear it, she wanted to share that as well. So Lawson developed a regimen of healthy foods that she likes and Sadie doesn’t, and she shares recipes and cooking tips in the book.

“From Sadie I learned that food can’t be your comfort, and it can’t be the thing that keeps you going,” Lawson said. “And I got active, that was the main thing. I got really active.”

The activity, which Lawson dubbed “dogercise,” included walking Sadie for the necessary bathroom trips, but also just playing and goofing around with the energetic dog. Lawson came up with some moves that work for strength and resistance training as well, such as “leash triceps” and “dog leg lifts,” in which she drapes Sadie over her calves and lifts her a few inches off the floor.

The furry little dog also helped Lawson to retool her way of looking at life.

“Dogs have such a spirit about them. They accept you, and they’re happy about everything. ... Sadie would watch me when I woke up in the morning, and her tail would wag. I mean, how can you be in a bad mood?” Lawson said.

While Sadie’s presence gave Lawson the inspiration to make healthy changes, it isn’t necessary to have a dog to make the “Dog Diet” principles work, Lawson said.

“Set a goal, and not an unrealistic one,” she said. “Make exercise something you enjoy, not something you hate. I don’t know anyone who likes running on a treadmill; it’s not fun. ... If you don’t have a dog, make an appointment to walk yourself. Everybody can get up a half hour early, and I think it makes the work day seem like that’s not your whole part of your day.”

On the diet side of things, it’s important to learn how to like healthy foods, Lawson said, and that can sometimes be accomplished by finding interesting spices or new ways of cooking.

“And learn when to stop. I have learned to quit eating when I’m not hungry anymore, and to eat when I’m hungry. ... And keep healthy stuff around. If you don’t have it in the house, you’re not gonna eat it.”

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Orlando Sentinal

July 20, 2007

Canine can-do: 'Dog Diet' does trick: Feeding and caring for a new puppy gave waggish author a new leash on life
Orlando Sentinal

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Savannah's Midmorning Live

July 19, 2007

Mid-Morning Live Watch the interview at Patti's RedRoom Site

How To Shed Pounds With Your Pooch

People who exercise with their pet tend to keep weight off, study shows

What's one sure-fire way to tell that it's time to lose weight?

Patti Lawson, author of "The Dog Diet: A Memoir," offers this no-nonsense tip: “If your dog is able to bite the extra fat on the back of your arms, it’s time to tone them up!”

Weight Tip

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Exclusive Look: The Dog Diet

A little puppy was the big change Patti Lawson needed to lose weight. When her new puppy Sadie began to shower her with unconditional love and devotion, it had an amazing effect on her -- Patti dropped pounds and gained peace and happiness.

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Glee Magazine: The Best Doggone Diet Ever

By Carolina Diaz-Bordon
Glee Contributor

A little puppy was the big change Patti Lawson needed to lose weight. When her new puppy Sadie began to shower her with unconditional love and devotion, it had an amazing effect on her -- Patti dropped pounds and gained peace and happiness.

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May 2006 Animal Radio Newsletter

May 3, 2006 ... THE LONGEST MINUTE by Patti Lawson Three years ago in the midst of a very cold, dreary winter that I spent wallowing in misery and stuffing ...

Dog-Eat-Lawyer World

April 21, 2006

People say there is a lot we can learn from our pets, and diet-obsessed lawyer and author, Patti Lawson has learned so much from her dog that she decided to write a book about it. The Dog Diet, A Memoir: What My Dog Taught About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life, is a reflectionary narrative chronicling the author´s adoption of a puppy named Sadie, and her subsequent realizations about the foods we love, loathe and lick our lips over. Dieters and dog-lovers alike will relate to the tongue-in-cheek script about how a dog taught a lawyer how to eat. Lawson will discuss the book and sign copies April 22 from 11 a.m. to noon at Bookworm, 968 Farmington Ave., West Hartford. (860) 233-2653.

-- A.B.

Copyright © 2006, Hartford Advocate

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Resolve to skip that diet drink and pick up a leash

USA Today, 1/3/2006

E-mail Craig Wilson at cwilson@usatoday.com

I ate just about everything over the holidays.

There I was, standing in front of my mom's refrigerator, pouring yet another glass of eggnog with one hand while the other was roaming a tin of treats that came from Sharon, a neighbor who knows her way around a cookie sheet.

At one point, I dug into a bag of holiday goodies that I thought tasted odd. That didn't stop me from having a second one, though, until I realized I was munching from Maggie's Christmas gift — fancy dog treats in a variety of shapes, including a fire hydrant. They weren't that bad. Honest.

I'm not alone, of course. My colleague Jayne admits she has been shoveling in cookies and candy as fast as she can hunt them down. She made her confession while fumbling around in a box of chocolates that appeared on the counter near her desk. She then moved on to a bag of Italian cookies. She highly recommended the ones "with the little jelly centers."

But then again, what's the harm, really, in eating anything you want during this brief period we call the holidays? I've always believed in the "enjoy it while it's here" philosophy.

And now we're home free.

It's the first week in January, eggnog is nowhere to be found, and Sharon's cookies are long gone. The box of chocolates next to Jayne's desk has disappeared, too. (Thanks mostly to Jayne.)

Years ago, I wrote that the only New Year's resolution anyone needed to make was to get a dog. A dog will get you out of bed in the morning, get you on a walk you otherwise wouldn't take, and the pounds will drop off. (That and eating his treats.)

Patti Lawson, a trial attorney in Charleston, W.Va., understands this. Her book, The Dog Diet: A Memoir, will be out in April, and it outlines how a dog can help you drop pounds. It worked for her when a puppy named Sadie entered her life.

One of her tips: "When it comes to snacking, if your dog likes it, it's probably not good for you."

I already have Maggie and know all too well that having a dog will keep you active whether you want to be or not.

So I come with another diet tip this January.

At the beginning of last year, when I decided to take a break from drinking alcohol, I thought the pounds would just fall off. By February, I'd be everyone's Valentine. But by March, nothing had happened. In fact, I'd gained weight. How cruel the world can be. No wine but no new waistline, either.

Then I analyzed my new eating/drinking habits, just as diet gurus advise. I had replaced my daily wine with Diet Coke. Gallons of it. And what I realized was it made me hungry all the time. So I dropped it, too. Lost 14 pounds by Memorial Day.

This finding is not the result of a long-term study on my part, though I recall researchers may have come up with a similar conclusion. But then again, no one seems to be paying attention to science these days.

All I know is I stopped drinking Diet Coke, and I lost weight.

Give it a try. And you don't have to get out of bed early for it to work, either.

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The Dog Diet ~ A Memoir by Patti Lawson
What My Dog Taught Me About Shedding Pounds, Licking Stress and Getting a New Leash on Life
The Dog Diet at HCI
| Email Patti: thedogdiet@aol.com
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